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Archive for the ‘Hawaiian quilting’ Category

Quilt Festival Houston 2014: where to find me and my work

Sunday, October 26th, 2014

It’s that wonderful time of the year again, Festival!  When you say “Festival” to a dedicated quilter, they know there is only ONE Festival that counts, the Big One In Houston.  Same thing–if you say Houston, we all know what that means–FUN, Friends, Quilts, all under one enormous roof.   I’m teaching again this year and will have four quilts in the exhibit area, plus two small pieces in a booth.  Read on!

Learn to make the painted fabrics in this project in my mini-Whimsy class at IQF-International Quilt Festival Fall 2014.

Learn to make the painted fabrics in this project in my mini-Whimsy class at IQF-International Quilt Festival Fall 2014.  See Thursday and Friday October 30 and 31.

Sunday, Oct. 26:  Travel from Maine to Texas.  Provided all goes well, I will not only have time to check in to the Teachers’ Room, find my shipped items and get ready for my first class on Monday, I’ll be able to get to the International Quilt Market show (already have my credentials!) to visit some friends who will be there only for Market.

Nourish the Body, Nourish the Soul, in the 500 Traditional Quilts exhibit. (c) Sarah Ann Smith.

Nourish the Body, Nourish the Soul, in the 500 Traditional Quilts exhibit. (c) Sarah Ann Smith.

Monday, Oct. 27:  I’m teaching Let’s Machine Quilt, my intro to Machine Quilting class.  Class runs from 9-5, with a two hour lunch break which I plan to spend on the show floor making more contacts at market.  When online registration closed, I think there were a couple spots left in this class.  If you’re interested, sign up at registration at Market.

Insalata, (c) Sarah Ann Smith 2014.  First major presentation in public at lecture, Tuesday, How Did She Do That?

Insalata, (c) Sarah Ann Smith 2014. First major presentation in public at lecture, Tuesday, How Did She Do That?

Tuesday, Oct. 28:  I’ll be giving my lecture, How Did She Do That?  It is a virtual trunk show of what I do and how I do it, supplemented with at least half a dozen real live quilts.   These lectures are in HUGE rooms so there is always room for more people.  I’m hoping to attend the lecture before me at 10.  Then at noon, I’ll be going to the luncheon and lecture (as will be many of the folks in my lecture).  Tuesday is the day the Market-only booths pack up and depart and the Festival-only booths arrive and begin setting up.  So I figure either the lecture will be full or empty (with folks having chosen to go off into the city or busy with booth set-up/take-down).  DO come–it’s so much more fun to talk to a room with people in it!

Haleakala Sunrise, (c) 2004 Sarah Ann Smith.  In the 500 Traditional Quilts exhibit.

Haleakala Sunrise, (c) 2004 Sarah Ann Smith. In the 500 Traditional Quilts exhibit.

Wednesday, Oct. 29:  Teaching Birch Pond Seasons, my third year in a row for this intro to art quilting and fused collage.  This is a no-sewing class and I’m thrilled to report it filled during online enrollment!  It’s my third year in a row teaching this class at Houston–so glad it works well for so many.  I encourage students to do their own thing–no copy-the-teacher stuff in my classes!

And some art cloth--this is SO not my typical, but I could see playing with surface design, a lot, to make more fabrics to use in my more typical style.  I wanted to have something totally "not me" though so that students get to try both representational and not!

And some art cloth–this is SO not my typical, but I could see playing with surface design, a lot, to make more fabrics to use in my more typical style. I wanted to have something totally “not me” though so that students get to try both representational and not!

Thursday, Oct. 30:  One of six presenters at Machine Quilting Forum (sold out) from 9-Noon.   Attending the lecture and teacher appreciation luncheon Noon to 2.  From 5-6 I will be teaching a mini-Whimsy Class at the Fiber on a Whim Booth, #144.  For more info, see  here and  here and here   There is no advance sign up–the first 8 people in line get in.  All supplies are provided by me.

In progress shot from The Nest, (c) 2014 Sarah Ann Smith.

In progress shot from The Nest, (c) 2014 Sarah Ann Smith, part of Sarah’s Whimsy Class.

Friday, Oct. 31:  From 11-Noon I’ll be teaching my mini-Whimsy Class (see Oct. 30 info and links).  Then from 5:30 to 7, I’ll be “on duty” in the Inspired by the Beatles exhibit.  In the evening, I’ll be enjoying diner the company of the marvelous artists in the Dinner@8 group.

Two of Us (c) 2013 Sarah Ann Smith.  Inspired by the Beatles challenge and exhibit.

Two of Us (c) 2013 Sarah Ann Smith. Inspired by the Beatles challenge and exhibit.

Saturday, Nov. 1:  almost first thing, I’ll be in the Machine Quilting Unlimited booth for an interview (who me?)!  I’ve written for them quite a bit back in 2008-9 and over the past 16 months.  This is one of the best magazines out there, especially if you love machine quilting, whether traditional, contemporary, modern, art….it’s a keeper!   Then I’m officially “OFF DUTY” and get to race around and see everything and everyone.

I’ve shared photos of my works on display throughout this post, but here they are in a list:

500 Traditional Quilts exhibit:

  • Nourish the Body, Nourish the Soul
  • Haleakala Sunrise

Dinner@8 Reflections exhibit:

  • Eli, Cross-Country 2013

Inspired by the Beatles exhibit:

  • Two of Us (blogpost here)

Fiber on a Whim booth #144

  • The Nest
  • White-Gray-Black-Red-Gold artcloth

See you in HOUSTON!  WOOOOOOHOOOOOO!!!!!

 

 

Published again! Quilt Essential

Sunday, February 23rd, 2014

Hi all!  I can’t believe I haven’t had time to blog about this yet, but I have been published again!   This time in the new book Quilt Essential:  a Visual Directory of Contemporary Patterns, Fabrics and Color by Erin Burke Harris, part of C&T’s “Stash Books” series.  If you are new to quilting and want an overview book, this one is a good one.  It has a very “Quilt Modern” feel to it:  fresh, airy, not fussy, and covers a lot of basics.

The cover of Quilt Essential

The cover of Quilt Essential

I was thrilled when I was invited to submit some quilts for consideration, and even more thrilled when I received a copy and learned I was in the book three times!

My Haleakala Sunrise pattern (available here in my shop and also at Pacific Rim Quilt Company, a great resource for Hawaiian and applique patterns)

My Haleakala Sunrise quilts ( pattern available here in my shop and also at Pacific Rim Quilt Company, a great resource for Hawaiian and applique patterns) are both featured on the opening pages for the Hawaiian Quilts Section (mine are the blue-yellow and red-green).

The book is divided into four major sections:

  • 1.  Fabrics:  covers types of fabrics, yardage and measuring, and caring for fabrics.
  • 2.  Colors:  color theory, and matching fabrics and colors.
  • 3.  Designs:  Shapes, quilt blocks, block layouts and settings, styles and arrangements, sashing and borders, embellishment.
  • 4.  Assembling:  piecing, quilt sandwiching, quilting methods, bindings.

The book includes profiles of well-known quilters as well as works by other quilters (including me!).  Here’s a couple more photos:

My Koi quilt is in the art Quilt section (detail, bottom left, where I'm thrilled to share a page with Lura Schwartz Smith-no relation).

My Koi quilt is in the Pictorial Quilt section (detail, bottom left, where I’m thrilled to share a page with Lura Schwartz Smith-no relation).

A big detail shot of The Tide is Hire, my pieced, appliqued and beaded quilt which is in the International Quilt Festival Collection (!!!!).

A big detail shot of The Tide is Hire, my pieced, appliqued and beaded quilt which is in the International Quilt Festival Collection (!!!!).

If you know of anyone who is beginning their quilt journey or just wants a good single overview book with a fresh feel to it, this book would be just the thing!  Thank you Erin for including me!

Catching up, more March and April

Sunday, July 14th, 2013

Gosh, I must say I am thrilled at all the work that fell  out of the sky onto me this past spring, but it is nice to be able to take a breather, blog a bit, sit on the sofa with a bit, sit on the porch and enjoy the summer breeze (ok, so at the moment the breeze is imaginary but I can hope one wafts in soon ans disperses the hot and muggy weather that is doing us all in as I type this…hopefully by the time this posts to the blog the “hot, hazy and humid” forecasts will be done and we’ll be back to glorious Maine summers).

This is a bit of a catch-all post to catch you up on life, so in somewhat random order….

In April I lectured in Massachusetts, then taught in Rutland, Vermont.  As you might guess, the class was Hawaiian Applique by machine which I will be teaching TWICE in Southern California this month!

In April I lectured in Massachusetts, then taught in Rutland, Vermont. As you might guess, the class was Hawaiian Applique by machine which I will be teaching TWICE in Southern California this month!  Didn’t this student do a beautiful job with her satin stitching on the turtles block?

Here's the classroom, on the lower level of a hospital center!

Here’s the classroom, on the lower level of a hospital center! Thanks to all the ladies who came–what fun!

And here's a taro leaf block, another of the "small" options in this class.  Lovely!

And here’s a taro leaf block, another of the “small” options in this class. Lovely!

As luck would have it, my route (yippeee!) took me from Massachusetts right past my friend Jacquie’s house on the way to Rutland, where I didn’t have to be until the evening lecture.  So of course I got to make a small detour and visit, and of course she fed me (Jacquie is a MUCH better and more inspired cook than I am).  When I arrived (late, I’m Sorry jq!) she was on Skype with her daughter Melanie, who lives in Germany, so I got to visit with Melanie too!   We had so much fun yakking and sharing that we forgot to pull out Melanie’s elderflower cordial that she made, so I’ll just have to manage another trip to Vermont.

I LOVE this picture...which I managed to take with arm extended.  It only took about three tries to get a decent one, too!

I LOVE this picture…which I managed to take with arm extended. It only took about three tries to get a decent one, too!

In April, Eli's track and field season began.  Here's an early season meet, with him throwing the javelin.  Look at that glorious sky and that beautiful boy-child (OK, soon to be young man) of mine!  So proud of him--this is his third varsity sport this year, as a Freshman!  And he qualified for States, making it three for three.  Well done, kiddo!

In April, Eli’s track and field season began. Here’s an early season meet (the deciduous trees are still bare), with him throwing the javelin. Look at that glorious sky and that beautiful boy-child (OK, soon to be young man) of mine! So proud of him–this is his third varsity sport this year, as a Freshman! And he qualified for States, making it three for three. Well done, kiddo!

Earlier, in the spring snowmelt and rain, our driveway (3/10 of a mile long…there is this big rectangle with lots all around it, and one long skinny driveway to the lot in the middle which is us) washed out, really badly on the bottom.  So we sucked it up and paid serious money to put in a proper ditch that would deal with all the water.  Cost about as much as (OUCH!) a nice used car! Here are the markings from when DigSafe came to show where NOT to dig:

Getting ready for ditching on the uphill side of the long driveway.  The red shows where there are utility pipes (electric and phone/internet) underground.

Getting ready for ditching on the uphill side of the long driveway. The red shows where there are utility pipes (electric and phone/internet) underground.

Then, here are a couple more shots of me prepping for filming the Quilting Arts DVD on May 1 (my full blogpost on that is here):

Setting things up as they would be seen on camera, in the "stuff you'll need" part of the DVD at the beginning.

Setting things up as they would be seen on camera, in the “stuff you’ll need” part of the DVD at the beginning.

And working on the preliminary quilting for the piece I would quilt on the set.  I needed to have the tomatoes in various stages of being quilted to demo the difference from unquilted to partialluy done, to done, plus one to work on while filming.

And working on the preliminary quilting for the piece I would quilt on the set. I needed to have the tomatoes in various stages of being quilted to demo the difference from unquilted to partialluy done, to done, plus one to work on while filming.

So that’s a bit more of why I’ve been so quiet these past months–LOTS of work and family life.  Life is good!

 

 

 

 

 

IQA: Quilt Festival Traditional Quilts

Thursday, November 19th, 2009

As an ardent art quilter, you might not guess that I began my quilting journey with traditional quilts (my first is a Wild Goose Chase variation from McClun and Knownes Quilts! Quilts!! Quilts!!! book, my second a Mariner’s Compass from a pattern by Mary K. Ryan of Vermont), and still absolutely adore them even if I don’t find the time to make them.  There was a wonderful exhibit of quilts from Texas, and I was able to take pictures.

Star of Stars, c. 1845, Unknown maker

Star of Stars, circa 1845, by an Unknown Maker, was on this year’s totebag (which you can see in the last picture on this post) and is simply spectacular in  color, design and workmanship.  It is a large quilt…101 by 101 inches, which is plenty big for a king sized bed!

2009.10.blog.IQAFall2009Trad'lTx006

Oh My Gosh, by Diane Tenney, is a contemporary quilt.   The small flying geese triangles that make the diagonal lines on the quilt look like they are about 1.5 inches on the LONG side of the triangle!!! EEEK!

Log Cabin, Streak of Lighting setting, 65 1/2 x 77 inches; no date estimated; unknown maker.  I’m not usually wild about streak of lightning settings, but I really liked the use of value (light versus dark) in this one:

2009.10.blog.IQAFall2009Trad'lTx004

I love log cabin quilts, tho, and this one with plaids was no exception.  It is 53 x 66 inches, dates to circa 1875-1885, by an unknown maker  The logs are barely a half-inch wide finished size!

2009.10.blog.IQAFall2009Trad'lTx003

And here’s a detail..oh my!

2009.10.blog.IQAFall2009Trad'lTx002

The final quilt I’ll share is a Grandmother’s Flower Garden with silk green border.  You can tell that Quilts, Inc., does things right…this delicate quilt even had a special display podium to prevent undue stress on the quilt.  The hexgons are about 1/2 inch across!!!!:

2009.10.blog.IQAFall2009Trad'lTx001

If I recall correctly, all these quilts are in the International Quilt Festival collection…. I wonder how large that collection is… I’d love to see them ALL displayed some year but I expect it would take over the entire convention center, or nearly!

Next:  The Frayed Edges in October….Deborah came from Texas for a FUNDERFUL visit, then more on Festival.  Cheers, Sarah