Archive for the ‘International Quilt Festival’ Category

Coming to a show near you!

Monday, March 31st, 2014

Wow… this is fun:  I am shipping out FOUR quilts to various shows and exhibits today!   The first one to go on display is Conversations 1, at the big AQS show in Paducah!  Then two are going off to be in the Traditional Treasures special exhibit for the International Quilt Festivals in Chicago and (in fall) Houston, and then the pug-love is headed off to a round of exhibits with Mary Wilson Kerr’s Dare to Dance exhibit!

Conversations 1 is going to Paducah!

Conversations 1 is going to Paducah!

Next on the exhibit trail is Mr. Wiggles Does the Circle Dance.  This portrait of Pigwidgeon’s joy when getting his supper is in Mary Wilson Kerr’s soon-to-be-available book and exhibit “Dare to Dance:  An Artist’s Interpretation of Joy.”  You can read more about the exhibit and where it is going here.  This quilt is going to log a LOT of miles, starting in West Virginia, heading to MANY Sew Expo’s, MANY Mancuso shows and will return home after (get this!) two and half years on the road!   Wave hullo to our beloved pug when you see him!

Mr. Wiggles Does the Circle Dance is going on the road!  If you look closely (at least in person) you can see below the bowl that I'm asking him "Are you hungry?"  That questions sets off the dance which begins with three (always three, only three) counter-clockwise (same direction always) circles.  He then runs behind your legs and bumps you in the direction of the closet which holds the kibble!

Mr. Wiggles Does the Circle Dance is going on the road! If you look closely (at least in person) you can see below the bowl that I’m asking him “Are you hungry?” That questions sets off the dance which begins with three (always three, only three) counter-clockwise (same direction always) circles. He then runs behind your legs and bumps you in the direction of the closet which holds the kibble!

Then, to my utter astonishment and complete delight, I have TWO quilts that made it into a **traditional** exhibit at International Quilt Festival, the Traditional Treasures that will debut in Chicago in June and return again in Houston.  This is the first time I’ve had traditional quilts juried in to a major national show, and I am elated!

This may be one of my favorite quilts.  It is inspired by a beer carton (for our grocery challenge, see blogposts here).  I revised the harbor to be Camden and the schooner to be the Louis B French.  The miniature storm at sea is mostly from a John Flynn quilt kit, with the small square in a square finishing at (EEEK) 1 1/8".  At least when I pieced them accurately!  Finished size is 20 1/2" square.

This may be one of my favorite quilts. It is inspired by a beer carton (for our grocery challenge, see blogposts here and here). I revised the harbor to be Camden, Maine, and the schooner to be the Louis B French. The miniature storm at sea is mostly from a John Flynn quilt kit, with the small square in a square finishing at (EEEK) 1 1/8″. At least when I pieced them accurately! Finished size is 20 1/2″ square.  This quilt and the next one will also (yippeee!) be included in Lark’s forthcoming 500 Traditional Quilts book!

And my Hawaiian inspired quilt, Nourish the Body, Nourish the Soul, will also be in IQF’s Traditional Treasures.  There are apparently only 25 quilts in this exhibit, so I am totally gobsmacked and humbled to have two quilts included.  Nourish is 64 inches square, is available as a pattern, and is the basis of my Hawaiian Applique by Machine class:

Nourish the Body, Nourish the Soul, by Sarah Ann Smith.  The blocks are either food (taro, pineapple or breadfruit) or things that are beautiful:  the plumeria with its heavenly scent and the bird of paradise.

Nourish the Body, Nourish the Soul, by Sarah Ann Smith. The blocks are either food (taro, pineapple or breadfruit) or things that are beautiful: the plumeria with its heavenly scent and the bird of paradise.

Have lots of things to share, but am so busy I don’t have much time to blog!  Will try to post again in a couple of days!

International Quilt Festival 2013, Houston, #7: Caryl Bryer Fallert-Gentry

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014
Caryl Bryer Fallert Gentry makes the leap into a new life

Caryl Bryer Fallert Gentry makes the leap into a new life

One of the stand-out exhibits of last Fall’s Houston International Quilt Festival 2013 was Caryl Bryer Fallert-Gentry’s exhibit of 30 for 30:  to celebrate 30 years of art quilts, she made 30 quilts 30×30 inches.  They celebrate her journey, invoking her style and techniques that have made her one of the pre-eminent art quilters of our day.  You can visit her website, here.

Many of you will know her for her vibrant rainbow-hued hand-dyes and appli-pieced quilts.  Some of you will remember the various styles she has tried over the years–remember the wonderful dandelion quilts?  the photo transfers?  the tucks and pleats?  All are represented in this exhibit.

Some of you may know that she realized a dream, building a  home and studio in Paducah with her husband after she retired from her “day job” with United (I think it was) airlines.  Her Paducah studio is amazing (here’s a link to an online tour of her studio), a perfect place to live and to offer workshops and sell her works and fabrics.  Then her husband died suddenly what seems like just a few years ago, but was actually  a few more than that.   After several years alone, she met Ron Gentry, love happened, and they married at the Quilt Museum in Paducah, with homes in Paducah and his home base of Port Townsend.  The quilt above is Caryl making the leap to this new life!  And I’ll put in a plug for her…the studio is now for sale!  Check here.

The exhibit was just inside the main doors as you enter the convention center on the quilt show side (as opposed to the vendor side) of Festival...what a wonderful way to begin!

The exhibit was just inside the main doors as you enter the convention center on the quilt show side (as opposed to the vendor side) of Festival…what a wonderful way to begin! Every time I passed by there were people taking photos and enjoying her work.

Remember the gradations of value, light, the piecing?

Remember the gradations of value, light, the piecing? Notice how perfectly centered the binding is, the yellow precisely in the middle, the mono-rpinted border, the quilting.  Sigh.

The nearly cellular-level "macro" shots?

The nearly cellular-level “macro” shots?

The photo transfer/prints years?  What is wonderful is that this is a new quilt, using photos from the Pacific Northwest and her new life, but in the style of these particular years.

The photo transfer/prints years? What is wonderful is that this is a new quilt, using photos from the Pacific Northwest and her new life, but in the style of these particular years.

A symphony of color

A symphony of color.  SWOON!

Be still my beating heart!  The lighting was great when you were standing there looking at the quilt, but my photos are a bit washed out--the color was more vibrant.

Be still my beating heart! The lighting was great when you were standing there looking at the quilt, but my photos are a bit washed out–the color was more vibrant.

And a detail:

Look at that quilting.  And of course the quilts are perfectly flat, perfectly square, perfectly perfect.

Look at that quilting. And of course the quilts are perfectly flat, perfectly square, perfectly perfect.

The best news is that you can see all the quilts here (and see how many are sold/reserved and which are still available).

And yet more color and movement and "Macro".  Sigh.  Swoon.

And yet more color and movement and “Macro”. Sigh. Swoon.

Though I didn’t buy the CD, a CD with proffesional photographs of this series and exhibit in its entirety is available.  Hope you’ve enjoyed this snapshot as much as I enjoyed seeing the quilts. Thank you, Caryl, for sharing your art and life with us.

International Quilt Festival 2013, Houston, #6, Decorative Stitching!

Friday, January 31st, 2014

Time for another catch-up post, about my Decorative Stitch Applique class on Friday at Quilt Festival.   I’m on a yahoo group for Janome 6600-7700-8900 owners, and a discussion cropped up about using the decorative stitches and I realized I had yet to post this information, so here goes!

The Funky Chicken, from Sarah's Decorative Stitch Applique class in Houston

The Funky Chicken, from Sarah’s Decorative Stitch Applique class in Houston.  Right click to enlarge image.  I’ve stacked (grouped) stitches on this one.  For example, the checkerboard (in yellow upper left) is two passes of a satin stitch that has two columns of small alternating squares.  To the lower right of the green square, a scroll stitch is bracketed with scallops.  The center square is appliqued, stitched with the “V” stapes, then outlined with a bold straight stitch.  Done on a Janome 8900.

Ya know how we all have these fancy machines that do a bazillion things, and pretty much 98 percent of the time (or more) all we do is use the straight stitch and sometimes the zigzag?   Well, when I wrote my book, Threadwork Unraveled, I included a section to teach folks how to play with their fancy stitches. This is the project in the book and the regular class project.

Decorative Stitch sampler for my Decorative Stitch Class.

Decorative Stitch sampler for my Decorative Stitch Class.

I teach that section as a class which was offered this year at Quilt Festival.  This year I came up with a couple new projects as class options for students. Most of the students did the usual tossed leaves project for this class, but one loved my Funky Chicken.   Here she is early in the day, filling the background with fun stitch combinations in fun colors:

This student used the same colors as my sample.  We were luckily in the Janome classroom with the FABULOUS 15000 machines.  I've never been a fan of computer-screen sewing machine models, as I prefer visual knobs and buttons.  Well, let me tell that has changed!  I have severe sewing machine lust for one of these babies!  And they have even more (!!!) stitches than the already fabulous 8900!

This student used the same colors as my sample. We were luckily in the Janome classroom with the FABULOUS 15000 machines. I’ve never been a fan of computer-screen sewing machine models, as I prefer visual knobs and buttons. Well, let me tell that has changed! I have severe sewing machine lust for one of these babies! And they have even more (!!!) stitches than the already fabulous 8900!

Other students put their own spin on the leaves:

A student is making sample blocks with decorative stitches

A student is making sample blocks with decorative stitches.  This is a great way to test out pattern combinations–here she has a practice square to toss out and her “real” piece on the left.  If you have a practice square, that means you don’t have to pick out the stitches if you don’t like them!

Close up of decorative stitching on an aspen leaf.

Close up of decorative stitching on an aspen leaf.

This student tried a very bold, wide multi-stitch zigzag.

This student tried a very bold, wide multi-stitch zigzag.  You can see this is her practice bit–see how she has tested the appearance of various stitches in the strip on the right?

I made a smaller (about 9 inches square) quiltlet with the sampler leaf and the background stitching.  If you right click on this image, you can see more detail.  Notice how I layered up stitches to applique the green patch and how I used a decorative stitch on the binding.  On the latter, I used matching thread to machine stitch down the binding, then went over that with a decorative stitch.

I made a smaller (about 9 inches square) quiltlet with the sampler leaf and the background stitching. If you right click on this image, you can see more detail. Notice how I layered up stitches to applique the green patch and how I used a decorative stitch on the binding. On the latter, I used matching thread to machine stitch down the binding, then went over that with a decorative stitch.

And a happy student with her nearly-done funky chicken:

Thank you, Barb Brown of Colorado, for taking my class!   I love your chicken!

Thank you, Barb Brown of Colorado, for taking my class! I love your chicken!

The day ended with one of my favorite things at Festival:  FRIENDS!  This evening was the Dinner@8 artists.  Jamie Fingal and Leslie Tucker Jenison curate an exhibit each year for several years now, and I am thrilled to have been both invited to submit pieces and accepted in the exhibit!   My orca quilt, seen in earlier blogposts on Festival 2013, was in this year’s Exquisite Moment exhibit.  Here a bunch of us who were at Festival enjoy dinner and friendship and art!

One of the two tables of folks in the Dinner@8 exhibit.  Leslie is at the head of the table, next to Diane Rusin Doran (in pink), Susan Brubaker Knapp (glasses) and Lyric Kindard (only partly in the photo--sorry Lyric!)

One of the two tables of folks in the Dinner@8 exhibit. Leslie is at the head of the table, next to Diane Rusin Doran (in pink), Susan Brubaker Knapp (glasses) and Lyric Kinard

And too much fun not to include, Susan and I taking pictures of each other taking pictures!

And too much fun not to include, Susan and I taking pictures of each other taking pictures!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

International Quilt Festival 2013, Houston, #5

Wednesday, January 22nd, 2014
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Wind by Masanobu Miyama of Japan

When the curtain went up on this major prize winning quilt, I knew we had a game-changer.  With apologies for the analogy, this quilt is about the size of my placemat!  Finally, art quilters don’t have to force themselves to work somewhere between large and vast to have a chance at a top prize.  

The signage for that glorious dog.

The signage for that glorious dog.

That puppy made a second appearance in the quilt show in this larger quilt which Masanobu made with his wife:

A much larger quilt (I'd guess at least 60 inches) by Hiroko Miyama and Masanobu Miyama.  Do you see the Golden with the little boy?

A much larger quilt (I’d guess at least 60 inches) by Hiroko Miyama and Masanobu Miyama. Do you see the Golden with the little boy?

And the signage:

The artists' comments about this quilt.

The artists’ comments about this quilt.

Here’s a detail of the small quilt…breathtaking!

Detail of "Wind" by Masanobu Miyama

Detail of “Wind” by Masanobu Miyama.  Perfection!

A two-fer, both wonderful!

A two-fer, both wonderful!

2013.11.10.FestivalFavoritesB013The quilt on the left so impressed Karey Bresenhan and Nancy O’Bryant Puentes, co founders (along with their moms–they are cousins) that it won an Honorable Mention.  Here’s a detail:

Detail, A Truly Feathered Star by

Detail, A Truly Feathered Star by Karen Sievert

I was so tickled to see this quilt which I had first seen in the Art Quilts Maine exhibit at Maine Quilts.  It is by Julie Weaver, and is her first quilt (but I hope not last!) to be juried into Houston.

I was so tickled to see this quilt which I had first seen in the Art Quilts Maine exhibit at Maine Quilts. It is by Julie Weaver, and is her first quilt (but I hope not last!) to be juried into Houston.

Even more fun, I'm on the show floor when I hear, "Hi, Sarah," And it is Sarah Carpenter and Julie Weaver, from Maine!

Even more fun, I’m on the show floor when I hear, “Hi, Sarah,” And it is Sarah Carpenter and Julie Weaver, from Maine!

Artie Facts by Joyce Patterson.   How can you not LOVE this image?

Artie Facts by Joyce Patterson. How can you not LOVE this image?

And the signage:

Artie Facts info

Artie Facts info

Hope you enjoy!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

International Quilt Festival 2013, Houston, #4

Saturday, January 11th, 2014

Wow… I’ve certainly been AWOL (Absent WithOut Leave)!   That’s what happens when I get busy.  Between Eli’s wrestling, daily life, and working on a quilt for Joshua, I was appalled to see it has been over a week since I posted.  So I thought I’d share some photos from Houston’s Quilt Festival.  Though it was a while ago, I haven’t shared yet, and it is still good eye candy!

Since I’m thinking about beginning this coming year’s entry for the Dinner@8 exhibit, let’s focus on this year’s exhibit which was themed “An Exquisite Moment.”  I struggled to come up with a theme for Rituals, but so many ideas came for this theme:  childbirth, nursing, Eli peeking at me from under the highbush blueberry bush, munching away, the peaceful comfort of a cup of tea and a good book.  But when I remembered the night we heard the orcas sing, and because all four of us remembered that night, that had to be the quilt for me.

It always thrills me when someone likes what I have made enough that they take a picture.  The blue quilt is my "Listen to the Song in the Night," which I blogged about here.

It always thrills me when someone likes what I have made enough that they take a picture. The blue quilt is my “Listen to the Song in the Night,” which I blogged about here.

I was doing much the same thing with several of the other pieces!  One of my favorites is by my friend Diane Perin Hock.  The feeling of tranquility and peace is palpable:

Diane Perin Hock's portrait of the Adirondack chair under the tree at a quilt retreat fill me with calm.  The colors, the serenity...I love this!

Diane Perin Hock’s “Serenity,” a portrait of the Adirondack chair under the tree at a quilt retreat fill me with calm. The colors, the calm…I love this!

And the same quilt in its "neighborhood."  The quilt to the immediate right is by Judy Coates Perez.

And the same quilt in its “neighborhood.” The quilt to the immediate right is Fear of Flying by Judy Coates Perez. The next one over (turning on the ignition) is Speed by Cheryl Sleboda, while the passion flowers to the left of Diane’s are by  Frances Alford.

Two more friends:  Deborah Boschert's red branch on the left and Rachel Parris's feeding the chickens on the right.

Two more friends: Deborah Boschert’s red branch is in the center and Rachel Parris’s feeding the chickens on the right.  I first met Rachel at a dinner of the artists (those who were at Festival) one year, and she is the most wonderful woman.  On the left is Jayne Larson’s Rainbow: A moment of reflection.  This year it was so much fun… I Facebooked my propped up feet at the airport on my way home, and Rachel promptly messaged me:  she was in the same terminal, so we got to have coffee together before we split to the corners of America!

I'm bummed that this photo isn't in sharp focus, but I love Deborah's quilt so much that I'm including it anyway.  It is quintessentially "Deborah," with her signature handwriting (this time on super-scale), branches, surface designs stamped and stenciled, but the colors are a-typical, giving it a wonderful freshness.

I’m bummed that this photo isn’t in sharp focus, but I love Deborah’s quilt so much that I’m including it anyway. It is quintessentially “Deborah,” with her signature handwriting (this time on super-scale), branches, surface designs stamped and stenciled, but the colors are a-typical, giving it a wonderful freshness.

Rachel Parris grows as an artist every year.  I totally adore this piece.  It makes me think of our grandmothers' time and lives, and love how Rachel used the writing on the apron.

Rachel Parris grows as an artist every year. I totally adore this piece, “Ordinary Day.” It makes me think of our grandmothers’ time and lives, and love how Rachel used the writing on the apron.

Cynthia St. Charles dyes and does a lot of surface design.

Cynthia St. Charles dyes and does a lot of surface design.  For Winter Walk II, she has carved blocks for stamping as well as using thermofax screens.

 

Cynthia St. Charles, detail:

Cynthia St. Charles, detail: Even in this photo it is hard to realize that she has stamped on many fabrics, collaged them, printed onto sheers, layered them…the piece is mesmerizing and is reinforcing my thnking that I really need to take more time to play, to dye fabric, to print and stamp and come up with my own cloth in addition to my signature tone-on-tone batiks.

I'll close with a neighborhood shot of my quilt on one side of the Dinner at 8 display.  I am so inspired by these women, and so pleased to be included in their company.

I’ll close with a neighborhood shot of my quilt on one side of the Dinner at 8 display. I am so inspired by these women, and so pleased to be included in their company.

For more about the Dinner at 8 artists and exhibits, visit the Dinner@8 blog.  If you’d like a show catalog, you can purchase one here, printed by Blurb.  Thank you to Loris Bogue for taking the time to put this together again this year!